DVDs (7)

by Chris Knox / 26 February, 2005

The Corporation (Madman) is a beautifully crafted two-hour-25-minute doco attempting to explain just what makes its title creature tick. And why the tick is more than likely that of a timebomb. Using talking heads (Naomi Klein, Michael Moore, Noam Chomsky and a whole raft of CEOs and other animals), archival footage and their own occasional constructs, the team of director Mark Achbar (who also made Manufacturing Consent), editor Jennifer Abbott and writer Joel Bakan have created a compelling case for their main premise that the corporation = the psychopath.

Hey, that's a bit tough, ain't it?!

Not the way these guys tell it.

Two commentaries (listen to the film-makers first), five and a half hours of extra interviews (!) and another hour or so of odds and sods, plus a stellar 16 x 9 transfer make up a package that'll keep you seething for weeks.

Metallica: Some Kind of Monster (Paramount) is a much less artful - and four minutes shorter - view of reality. The makers of Brothers Keeper and the Paradise Lost films spent two years with the world's biggest rock band and were there for the singer's meltdown and disappearance, the therapy that failed to prevent this - yet kept the band from imploding - and their eventual struggle to complete the album for which this was intended to be a promo.

Reviewers and friends led me to expect a Spinal Tap level of stupidity and, although there are moments that approach it, that is not fair to this film, this band or their - admittedly often irritating - therapist.

It is, in reality, a story of real courage, honesty and trust. I applaud the band - to whom I've never previously consciously listened - for letting this beast out into the world and the film-makers for creating something this cohesive out of 1600 hours of tape ... Hours of extremely worthwhile extras.

Terrible lyrics ...

MostReadArticlesCollectionWidget - Most Read - Used in articles
AdvertModule - Advert - M-Rec / Halfpage

Latest

The blue zone: Kiwi workers' wage gap trap
71457 2017-04-23 00:00:00Z Economy

The blue zone: Kiwi workers' wage gap trap

by Virginia Larson

For blue-collar workers, the gap between the haves and the have-littles is widening.

Read more
Suitably predictable: Why we're attracted to a uniform
71366 2017-04-23 00:00:00Z Psychology

Suitably predictable: Why we're attracted to a uni…

by Marc Wilson

Why firefighters get the girl more often than the average bloke does.

Read more
Empty nest: Can you be a parent and a minimalist?
71468 2017-04-22 00:00:00Z Social issues

Empty nest: Can you be a parent and a minimalist?

by Michelle Duff

The mind of a parent is in danger of becoming a cluttered wasteland, strewn with the skeletons of high chairs, baby slings and disused toys.

Read more
Jane Millton captures the plight of the Kaikoura cows in a kids' book
71343 2017-04-22 00:00:00Z Profiles

Jane Millton captures the plight of the Kaikoura c…

by Clare de Lore

Two cows and a calf grabbed international headlines after the Kaikoura earthquake, and the story of their rescue is now the subject of a new book.

Read more
Pollution in a Piha paradise
71451 2017-04-22 00:00:00Z Environment

Pollution in a Piha paradise

by Anusha Bradley

Piha is famous for its rugged black-sand beaches, but locals say Auckland Council needs to do more to fix the polluted lagoon.

Read more
Film review: Ghost in the Shell
71490 2017-04-21 12:05:59Z Movies

Film review: Ghost in the Shell

by Russell Baillie

Nothing dates faster than a past idea of the future.

Read more
The 9th Floor: Jim Bolger on his time as Prime Minister
71476 2017-04-21 11:29:57Z Currently

The 9th Floor: Jim Bolger on his time as Prime Min…

by Guyon Espiner

There is so much to the Bolger years. The first MMP government with Winston Peters, the economic growth of the mid-90s, and the birth of Te Papa.

Read more
Immigration: The battle lines are drawn
71454 2017-04-21 09:38:47Z Economy

Immigration: The battle lines are drawn

by Graham Adams

Bill English needs to win Auckland to win the election, but his latest immigration changes seem to ignore one of its citizens’ biggest concerns.

Read more