It's NZ music awards time again

by Fiona Rae / 03 October, 2009
It's the local music industry's big night of congregation and congratulation.

MTV Music Video Awards - pah. How boring were they? Kanye being a jackass (we can say that because Obama did), Lady Gaga looking like an explosion in a costume warehouse, and Russell Brand acting like ... well, Russell Brand. And could that Michael Jackson tribute have been any duller? Rubbish. We much prefer the 2009 Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards (C4, Thursday, 8.30pm), the local music industry's night of congratulation, confabulation and conviviality.

For the second year running, the awards are being held at the Vector Arena, Auckland, a venue big enough to accommodate all the nominees and their entourages, assorted music industry lackeys, PR wallahs, corporate hangers-on and members of the public who actually paid for a ticket.

For the third year running, the awards will be hosted by comedian Dai Henwood, who at least tells fewer knob jokes than Russell Brand. The big attraction this year is a performance from electro pop-rock 80s-inspired cult smash Ladyhawke, currently touring the US and Australia, who has been nominated in several categories. Smashproof, Midnight Youth and the Mint Chicks will also throw down. That might not be the correct expression.

C4 is going all out on the coverage, with a backstage show at 4.00pm, then red-carpet coverage from 7.30pm before the awards begin at 8.30pm. Presenting these on-screen shenanigans will be C4's Drew Neemia, Ruby Higgins (a contestant from New Zealand's Next Top Model), Dave Gibson from Elemeno P and Supergroove's Karl Steven. We pray they have been practising how not to make on-the-spot interviews inane.

All of this pales before the night's most crucial question: will John Key get the same rousing reception as Helen Clark got last year?

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