April 21-27: Including Anzac Day and Luckless on bFM

by fiona.rae / 21 April, 2012

SATURDAY APRIL 21


Saturday Morning with Kim Hill (Radio New Zealand National, 8.10am). Hill talks to American author and doctor David B Agus, who is one of the world’s leading cancer experts and pioneering biomedical researchers. His latest book, The End of Illness, challenges long-held beliefs about what it means to be healthy. She also meets New Zealand conductor Hamish McKeich, a rising star in the world of waving a baton in front of a musical ensemble. He has worked extensively with the NZSO and other local and overseas orchestras and is chief conductor of the contemporary ensembles Stroma and 175East.



Luckless/compilation Recorded Live at Roundhead Studios (95bFM, 11.00am and Friday, 2.00pm). Luckless consists of “two people who make melodic, neurotic indie rock”, drummer Will Wood and vocalist/guitarist Ivy Rossiter. The pair’s latest single, Hummingbird Heart, is a mini-masterpiece of melancholy, with Rossiter’s gorgeous voice and the song’s woeful vibe belying their strongest influences: Portishead, PJ Harvey and Sparklehorse. Part two is a compilation of tracks by Cairo Knife Fight, Bernie Griffen & the Grifters and the Verlaines that didn’t make it onto the original programmes. There will be live streaming and podcasts on 95bfm.com; scroll down for video of Luckless.

A Flat City: Voices of Christchurch Music (RDU98.5FM, 2.00pm). The Garden City’s punk and garage musos have their say today, featuring Joseph Sampson of T54, James Harding of the Transistors, Luke Wood of the Grand Chancellors and T’Neale Worsley of Bang! Bang! Eche!



Around the World in 80 Tunes (Radio New Zealand National, 4.10pm). Nick Dwyer has found Barnie Duncan and today they’re off to Romania, home of gypsy folk tunes. But the Eastern European country also has an active electronic and club culture – known as Balkan Beats. Dwyer meets Aurel Ionitsa of gypsy funk heroes Mahala Rai Banda (guests at February’s Womad festival) and Cosmin TRG, one of the country’s top club music producers.

SUNDAY APRIL 22


Composer of the week (Radio New Zealand Concert, 9.00am today and weekdays and 7.00pm Monday). Russian composer, pianist and conductor Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953) was one of the most important composers of the 20th century. He was precociously talented, writing his first piano pieces at the age of five and a complete opera at eight. He entered the St Petersburg Conservatory at 13 and learnt composition from Liadov, Rimsky-Korsakov and Nicholas Tcherepnine. He soon made a name for himself in Russian music circles and left his native land in 1918. He travelled extensively and ended up in the US, where he wrote his most successful opera, The Love for Three Oranges, for the Chicago Opera Company, and his Third Piano Concerto. In 1923 he moved to Paris, where he cemented his reputation as one of the most powerful and original composers of the era. He finally returned to Russia in 1932, where he was fêted and admired for 16 years. Then, without warning, he fell out of favour with the authorities and was denounced, along with other leading composers, for promoting ™anti-democratic formalism∫. However, by 1953, his position in the musical firmament was re-established and a special concert to celebrate his 60th birthday was sanctioned by the Government. His Seventh Symphony premièred in October 1952, to great acclaim. Prokofiev died of a cerebral haemorrhage on

Extended Play: the Classic Flying Nun EPs (95bFM, 11.00am). Episode two of this 22-part series, brought to you by 95bFM, NZ On Air and the Listener, looks at Three Songs by the Tall Dwarfs. Alec Bathgate, Doug Hood, Hamish Kilgour, Simon Grigg, and Paul Rose talk about the EP, which was recorded on Chris Knox’s Teac four-track system.

Young New Zealand (Radio New Zealand Concert, 8.35pm). NZSO Todd Corporation Young Composers Awards 2011 is a two-part series that begins tonight. In September, 13 young New Zealand composers had their works performed by the NZSO and, in this programme, Janina Nicoll talks to each composer and we hear a recording of their piece. Acclaimed Kiwi composer Ross Harris worked closely with last year’s group, and NZSO players led lunchtime masterclasses. The best overall composition was by Alex Taylor, who was awarded the NZSO Todd Corporation Young Composer Award, plus $750 and a commission to compose a piece to be performed by a chamber group from the NZSO in schools throughout New Zealand.

MONDAY APRIL 23


Music Alive (Radio New Zealand Concert, 8.00pm). Spring Strings was recorded in St Luke’s Presbyterian Church, Auckland, last October. It features AKBarok – New Zealand’s only orchestra that performs baroque music on “historical” instruments – with guest violinist Rachael Beesley, and the programme features works by ­Brescianello, Vivaldi, Durante, Geminiani and Corelli.

ANZAC DAY


Anzac Day Dawn Service of Remembrance (Radio New Zealand National, 5.45am). Warwick Burke presents the Dawn Ceremony of Remembrance from the Cenotaph in Wellington.

Eight till Noon with Richard Langston (Radio New Zealand National, 8.10am). Guest host Richard Langston presents a programme of reflection, conversation and entertainment to mark Anzac Day, including the documentary Kiss the Children for Me at 10.06am. It features the final words of Major Roger Nutbeam, second in command of 16 Field Ambulance of the Royal Army Medical Corps, written home from the Falkland Islands in 1982.



Matinee Idle (Radio New Zealand National, 12.12pm). And now for something, well, more irreverent, anyway. Phil O’Brien and Simon Morris present an afternoon of music that could be about anything. Let’s face it, they probably haven’t decided yet. But this much we do know: at 3.04pm, they’ll play a repeat of the excellent Next Stop Is Vietnam: The War on Record 1961-2008, a collection of recordings documenting, in song, the story of the US involvement in Vietnam.

The Wednesday Drama (Radio New Zealand National, 9.06pm). Tonight it’s The Cave of Winds by Elspeth Sandys, in which two Kiwi soldiers are in hiding after Crete has fallen to the Nazis. Members of the Resistance are risking all to shelter them as German troops draw closer.

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