Italian glossy editor expresses regret over nude Kate pics

by Toby Manhire / 25 September, 2012
But not the kind of regret you might imagine.
The editor of Chi, the Italian magazine that republished those fleshy pics of Kate Middleton, has regrets. Specifically, Alfonso Signorini regrets that the photographs of the British princess, which he showcased across 26 pages, were “all too politically correct – so middle-class, sadly.”

He tells the Italian newspaper Corriere Della Sera: “If I’d had any even more scandalous shots, I’d have happily published them.”

He adds, with a perplexing reference to Lewis Carroll: “Since Kate Middleton is not exactly Alice in Wonderland, she should have been expecting it.”

And: “Besides, I don’t understand why there wasn’t more of a fuss when photos of Prince Harry in the nude were published. Why should Kate’s breasts be treated any differently from Harry’s bits?”

Meanwhile Silvio Berlusconi, former Italian prime minister owner of the magazines that have presented the unclothed Kate, has been defended, in a letter to the Italian daily Repubblica. Defended by no less than his daughter, Marina, chair of the Mondadori group, which publishes Chi and the French Closer, where it all began.

She writes, as reported by Corriere:

What was my father supposed to do? Ride roughshod over Mondadori’s editorial freedom out of respect for the Duchess’s privacy while simultaneously serving his own interests as a politician? ... Mondadori was just doing its job. My father concerns himself with politics and has other things to think about apart from a photo feature.





But not the kind of regret you might imagine.

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