Survey: more New Zealanders use Google+ than Twitter

by Toby Manhire / 23 October, 2012
But all I can see is tumbleweed...


An interesting finding from a new Roy Morgan survey, "The Digital Universe": more New Zealanders use Google+ than Twitter, with the respective numbers for people aged 14 and above at 7% and 6%. Facebook is miles ahead on 56%.

Google+ currently has 260,000 visitors (7% of New Zealanders 14+) in an average four week period, which represents an increase of 20% over the last six months.


Only 6% of New Zealanders 14+ visit Twitter in an average four weeks, indicating that Twitter is still an ‘early adopter’ phenomenon. Twitter’s growth, however, continues and has increased 31% in the last 12 months.




I find the results astonishing. I know we Twitter users can easily mistake the importance of the thing outside our own happy pastures, but, honestly, it seems bizarre - I look at Google+ and see tumbleweed.

The survey appears not to measure volume of use, however, with a simple metric of "visitors" (ie at least one per month) - and it's a safe bet that Twitter would outstrip Google+ in terms of hours spent (wasted?) on the platforms.

News isn't everything, but if you look at the share-tallies above stories on any story on the Herald or Stuff sites, chances are there'll be a few dozen Twitter shares, a few more for Facebook, and Google+ sitting on zero, or one on a good day. The same can be said of most news sites overseas.

Google+ presumably gets a boost from the growth of its broswer, Chrome - which, as the Standard notes, has for the first time overtaken Microsoft Explorer to become New Zealand's most popular browser.

The numbers are even more pronounced in Australia. From the same Roy Morgan study:



h/t @tomaskriha via @richirvine
http://twitter.com/richirvine/statuses/260575414550945792
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