100% Gritty-earth

by Toby Manhire / 07 January, 2013
In contrast to the Hobbit backdrop, Jane Campion’s new miniseries shows a gritty and raw side of New Zealand.
Jane Campion's Top of the Lake.


Shh. No one tell John Key. Or the tourism people.

The rather brilliant Elisabeth Moss, who plays Peggy in Mad Men, has been talking about Top of the Lake, the Jane Campion directed new miniseries, shot in and around Queenstown, ahead of its debut on the US Sundance Channel in March.

In the series, a co-production with the BBC (and seemingly set to screen on UKTV in NZ), Moss plays a detective investigating the disappearance of a pregnant 12-year-old girl. Also appearing are Holly Hunter, Peter Mullan, Robyn Malcom and Lucy Lawless.

But the contrasts with Middle-earthy imagery are already being drawn.

From the Hollywood Reporter:

New Zealand is primarily known for the Lord of the Rings and Hobbit films but it was important for the people behind Top of the Lake to show a different side to the region.


"It's the most comprehensive documentation of modern New Zealand that's ever been done at such a large scale," Moss said. "We show a very different, much more modern, much grittier, much more raw side of it."


Watch out, Jane Campion. Mark Unsworth is probably writing you a thoughtful note even now.
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