Vacancy at ACC for "Social Media Sentiment Analyst"

by Toby Manhire / 30 April, 2013
State insurer seeks expert to "monitor blogs, wikis, news forums and online communities"
You’d have thought the sentiment in social media with regards to ACC would be fairly easy to guess, but the state accident insurer, which has had its share of tribulations with the online world, is looking to employ someone to assess it.

The ad reads:

As the Social Media Sentiment Analyst you will be responsible for monitoring blogs, wikis, news forums and online communities for consumer insight, whilst analysing service shortfalls, determining trends in social media outlets and providing service improvement recommendations across the organisation.  This role is essential for gauging public opinion and working towards increased trust and confidence in ACC.


Reporting to the Brand & Channel Manager you will be a part of the People and Communications Group. Your communications qualifications or previous experience will be put to great use as will your strong analytical skills and ability to provide recommendations based on insights to improve the overall service.


The vacancy - applications close in a week - has already gained attention online, if not perhaps the kind of attention they might have hoped for.

Such as this comment, at ACCForum, from “Bazil Fawlty”:

It sounds like the person who gets the job will be well rewarded for monitoring (spying) on forums such as this.


Once ACC have employed someone for this spying position, I wonder if under the OIA,it will be possible to get access to their collated information & their recommendations.


Certainly it’s encouraging to see ACC taking steps to “gauge public opinion” in the online world, but they might also consider engaging in it. Maybe, for instance, rather than a “sentiment analyst”, they could employ someone to look after their Twitter account:



And they don't appear to have a Facebook presence. At least, I don't think this is them:



h/t Ruth Laugesen
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