What to see at late-night gallery hop White Night

by India Hendrikse / 15 March, 2017
White Night is an excellent evening of late-night, city-wide gallery hopping. Here are some of Paperboy’s picks of the night’s best events, what you need to know about the night, and a Q&A with one of the artists involved.

White Night.

What is White Night?

Essentially, art in the dark. Galleries across Auckland are staying open late (some until midnight) and performances are popping up across the city. The best bit? It’s all free.

When is it?

Sat 18 Mar, 6pm–midnight.

Where is it?

Across Auckland, from the central city to the burbs! Check out White Night’s brand new website and interactive map at whitenight.aucklandfestival.co.nz.

How do you get around all the galleries?

Alongside your usual public transport picks (we recommend the Inner Link to take you around the city), White Night has two special tour options so you can go car-free for the night.

Option one: Gallery Hopper

Take in exhibitions in east Auckland (Te Tuhi), and west Auckland (Pah Homestead and Te Uru), plus an Indian carnival in Sandringham and live performances at pick-up and drop-off points.

When and where: The bus departs outside Q Theatre at 5.45pm and drops you back at 9.30pm. Free; bookings required.

Option two: Arts in the Hood

This itinerary starts at Ōtara’s Fresh Gallery and Māngere’s Arts Centre, before checking out live performances at the Glen Innes town centre. Back in town, the bus allows you to check out special performances at Studio One in Ponsonby and at Q Theatre.

When and where: The bus departs from south Auckland at two pick-up points: Fresh Gallery Ōtara and Māngere Arts Centre. Set off at 5pm and you’ll be back at 11.15pm. Free; bookings required.

What's on

All Hearts Are Sacred, by Rebecca Swan, From The Exquisite Wound

Der Papālagi (The White Man)

At St Paul Street Gallery, AUT

An exhibition exploring cultural appropriation and appreciation through a Samoan framework. Join actor David Fane as he reads the book Der Papālagi, the namesake and inspiration behind artist Yuki Kihara’s works, which are also on show.

The Halo Project

Silo Park

Artistic expression meets eco-activism in this series of paintings that reflects on New Zealand’s birdlife.

The Halo project

The Exquisite Wound

Silo Park

An installation combining photography, video and sound with an anatomical focus. Silo Park is also offering free live music throughout the night, so pack a picnic!

Picturing Asia: Double Take – the photography of Brian Brake and Steve McCurry

Te Uru Waitākere Contemporary Gallery, Titirangi.

Curator Ian Wedde has hand-picked some of the late New Zealand photographer Brian Brake’s work and mixed it with the work of American great Steve McCurry. The images all show Asia through the Western gaze.

‘Stilt Fishermen’ by Steve McCurry

 Whānui: Samaroh – The Great Indian Carnival

In Sandringham

The bustling streets of Mumbai come to Sandringham to create a carnival-like atmosphere and a lot of dancing.

 

Yona Lee, In Transit

 Te Tuhi centre for the Arts

In Transit is Auckland artist Yona Lee’s largest and most ambitious installation to date. We chat to her about the artistic process and what the chaotic structures symbolise.

In Transit by Yona Lee

What does your work explore?

My work attempts to address the universal barriers for human beings such as space, time and body as well as in language and culture.

How did In Transit come about?

It started with a visit to Seoul where I did a residency at SeMA Nanj through Asia NZ Foundation and Creative NZ. I wanted to incorporate the experience of travelling in Seoul, and about how much time you spend travelling. When you travel by metro train in a strange city, you are completely reliant on the maps in the metro station, and the way the city is reduced to a flat grid of the metro lines. So your experience of that place also becomes flattened, like the map lines. You become very aware of how much time you spend in transit. In Seoul, my residency was quite a distance from the station, and the way you travel everyday affects how you see a city, and how you relate to space.

Auckland artist Yona Lee.

How long did you spend working on this piece? What was the creative process like?

The project started in development in early 2016 with some initial discussions with the curator. Then I started in earnest around November 2016. Firstly I examine the space at Te Tuhi, as well as the whole building – how it functions, who uses it – the whole context and physicality of the space. And I work with drawings and making models to work out strategies. Then, it’s all about labour for a while- researching, cutting, welding and polishing.  

Have you made the work purposely difficult to explore/walk through? What was the purpose behind this?

There is a sense of curated pathways within the work. The work both restricts and directs people’s movement and encourages bodily interaction by incorporating daily activities such as sleeping, sitting, taking showers etcetera by making the work functional.

Catch Lee at Te Tuhi for an artist talk on White Night.

 


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