How to shop like a local, worldwide

by North & South / 05 September, 2017
In association with Kiwibank

Kiwibank’s Loaded™ for Travel card makes spending money overseas easier and more secure – and puts an end to the dreaded “bill shock”.

Technology has helped Kiwis feel more like global citizens. We move easily through the world, immersing ourselves in strange sights and capturing treasured moments on devices that once seemed unbelievable.

But the financial side of travelling can still trip us up –  or at least deliver some nasty surprises.

These days, traveller’s cheques, cash and even standard debit and credit cards just don’t cut it. Fees, fluctuating exchange rates and issues of security all niggle at travellers just when they want to relax and have fun.

Kiwibank’s Loaded for Travel card and mobile-phone app are leading the charge to ease such payment pain.

Loaded for Travel cards are Visa cards that can be loaded with any of 11 supported currencies – US dollars, British pounds, Euros and more – before you depart. This allows you to lock in exchange rates when you think they look good, ahead of your trip, and skip the international transaction fees charged on regular credit cards.

There’ll be no more nervous times carrying wedges of cash, especially if you’re visiting more than one country. Just load up the relevant currency wallets and you’re ready to shop online, or in-store like a local.

For added convenience, when you sign up for a Loaded for Travel card, you’ll also receive a back-up card. Having two cards means if one is lost or stolen, you can cancel that card via the 24-hour helpline and start using the other one straight away.

The card isn’t connected to your regular bank account, and you’re also covered by Visa’s Zero Liability Policy* if your card gets lost or stolen. 

Kylie Wing, Campaign Manager at Kiwibank, knows firsthand how managing money can get complicated when travelling. While she was in Thailand years ago, her friend’s one and only credit card was “eaten” by an ATM.

“That put a real dampener on the holiday,” says Wing. “We spent half a day going to a bank and ringing up New Zealand to get it all sorted out.”

Returning to a credit card statement that sends you into “bill shock” isn’t a worry with the Loaded for Travel card, either. You can only ever spend as much as you’ve loaded, and the app (available for Android and iOS) lets you keep an eye on your spending. Anywhere, anytime, you can check your balances, transfer funds between different currencies, update your details and change your PIN.

The good times can continue once you get home. Money left over in any of your currency wallets? Don’t worry, it’s not going anywhere – unless you want it to. You can use those US dollars, British pounds or Japanese yen to shop online. Or convert your foreign currency back to New Zealand dollars when you think the exchange rate looks good and spend the money right here.

Loaded for Travel is easy to set up and use, safe and convenient. This travel decision couldn’t be simpler. Now all you need to do is decide where to go next.

To get your own Loaded for Travel card, visit a Kiwibank branch, request one directly through Kiwibank Internet banking, or to find out more, visit loadedfortravel.co.nz.

Loaded™ for Travel cards issued by Kiwibank Limited. Loaded for Travel cards are only available for purchase by persons in New Zealand and are not offered to any person outside New Zealand. The Kiwibank “Loaded” names, logos and related trademarks and service marks are owned by Kiwibank Limited. Terms and conditions apply to the use of the Loaded for Travel card, and are available at loadedfortravel.co.nz. *you can find details about visa’s zero liability policy here. 

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