From Christmas Day

by Fiona Rae / 25 December, 2010
A pair of Far North featherless-chook fanciers offer respite from the usual Christmas fare.

Christmas is generally the time of year that the networks clean house, chucking on cheap series, repeats and Christmas specials they've hoarded in the cupboard since last year. Bah. Let's not go down that route. Let us turn to something new and local. Something that is a worthy successor to Wayne Anderson: Singer of Songs and The Jaquie Brown Diaries. Something that is part of a trend that is making us look like mockumentary geniuses.

Rural Drift (TV2, Wednesday, 10.30pm) is a divine comedy about a fool and his friend who head into the country with little more than the dream of raising featherless chickens and breeding tiny pigs. It stars Orlando Stewart, who played Orlando Stewart in the media satire Feedback, and was Wayne Anderson's manager, er, Orlando Stewart. The fact that he is able to use his real name in all these series is a measure of the meta nature of television these days. "It's kind of fun blurring the lines between yourself and a character," he says.

In Rural Drift's iteration of Orlando Stewart, he is a no-hoper handing out flyers for Hell Pizza in Pakuranga. When he inherits his auntie's house in deepest Hokianga, he decides to strike out for a better life for himself and his family. He and his friend Nathan Rea (played by - who else? - Nathan Rea) forge ahead to get the place ready. Naturally, it is not what they expected, and the locals in the small town of Horeke are not welcoming. "The notion of a rural lifestyle holds a certain attraction," says Stewart. "I was also interested in how even though the notion of the good, keen man pervades our culture, we're basically a fairly useless bunch." Yes, indeed - and all the better to make a classic Kiwi comedy.

Latest

A big science investment - but where’s the transparency?
99199 2018-11-17 00:00:00Z Tech

A big science investment - but where’s the transpa…

by Peter Griffin

An extra $420m is being pumped into the National Science Challenges - but the reasoning behind the increased investment won't be released.

Read more
NZ music legend Gray Bartlett has a new album – and a wild past
99182 2018-11-16 13:32:58Z Music

NZ music legend Gray Bartlett has a new album – an…

by Donna Chisholm

We revisit this profile on award-winning guitarist Gray Bartlett, who's just released a new album, Platinum!

Read more
Vint Cerf: The father of the Internet reflects on what his creation has become
99178 2018-11-16 13:13:08Z Tech

Vint Cerf: The father of the Internet reflects on …

by Peter Griffin

"We were just a bunch of engineers trying to make it work. It didn't even occur to us that anybody would want to wreck it," says Vint Cerf.

Read more
Win a double pass to the NZ premiere screening of Mary Queen of Scots
99165 2018-11-16 10:51:28Z Win

Win a double pass to the NZ premiere screening of …

by The Listener

Starring Academy Award nominees Saoirse Ronan and Margot Robbie, Mary Queen of Scots explores the turbulent life of the charismatic Mary Stuart.

Read more
Goodside: The North Shore’s new food precinct
99155 2018-11-16 09:33:23Z Auckland Eats

Goodside: The North Shore’s new food precinct

by Alex Blackwood

North Shore residents will have plenty to choose from at Goodside.

Read more
The death of Radio Live
99147 2018-11-16 06:54:48Z Radio

The death of Radio Live

by Colin Peacock

14 years after launching “the new voice of talk radio”, MediaWorks will silence Radio Live. Mediawatch looks at what could replace it.

Read more
Should Lime scooters stay or should they go?
99103 2018-11-16 00:00:00Z Social issues

Should Lime scooters stay or should they go?

by The Listener

For every safety warning, there’ll be a righteous uproar about the public good regarding the environment. It's about finding the right balance.

Read more
Kiwi drama Vermilion is hamstrung by a frustrating lack of clarity
98992 2018-11-16 00:00:00Z Movies

Kiwi drama Vermilion is hamstrung by a frustrating…

by James Robins

Academic and film-maker Dorthe Scheffmann has had a hand in some of New Zealand cinema’s most beloved movies. So what went wrong?

Read more