A strange disappearance in Grimshawland: Charlotte Grimshaw's Mazarine reviewed

by Mark Broatch / 30 April, 2018
RelatedArticlesModule - Mazarine Grimshaw

Charlotte Grimshaw: spinning plot plates. Photo/Jane Ussher

Charlotte Grimshaw’s latest novel Mazarine is an absorbing, multi-layered mystery.

Frances Sinclair is an Auckland writer, of journalism, fiction, screenplays. She lives alone, her daughter Maya having gone to London with her boyfriend, Joe. Then Maya disappears, at least in the 21st-century sense of not staying in touch digitally. When a shady ex, Patrick, randomly appears in Frances’s house, she gets spooked and makes a hasty decision to find her daughter.

The Mazarine of the title of Charlotte Grimshaw’s new novel is Joe’s mother, whom Frances tries to track down to see if she can help. The action shifts to London and Paris, and to reveal any more would jeopardise the suspense.

Grimshaw’s novels always deliver tension, intrigue, drama. Her stories are contemporary, usually vividly set in Auckland or thereabouts and packed with plot.

Serious doesn’t mean po-faced, though. The book bristles with life and is full of sensations, humour, rippling interchanges and sudden poetry: “I … found my seat and settled in for the next round, the stunned hours, the dizzy curve of the Earth, dreams of Patrick and Maya.” It comments on society, not gauchely, but in passing glances and subtle asides. Grimshaw cares about the world we live in and asks us to care, too.

As in previous books, fragments of reality intrude to make up an alternative world we might call Grimshawland: Frances went to Menton in France as a child; Grimshaw’s father, CK Stead won the Katherine Mansfield fellowship to Menton in the 70s. A Herald interviewer is charmed by Frances’s dog and wonders about the dragonfly on the cover of her book. Alice Munro and David Foster Wallace are discussed. There’s the awful shadow of Trump, Madeleine McCann, even the cartoonist Bromhead. Characters in previous novels resembled John Key, John Campbell and Kim Dotcom.

It’s not just things verifiable: Grimshaw builds involving emotional worlds. Frances is lonely, feels unable to read people and frets about whether she’s losing her grip, and it’s to the author’s credit that we are never quite sure about that, either. Frances slowly finds her way, comes to unexpected realisations, perhaps discovers a new, real self.

It’s been a while since Grimshaw has headed overseas in her novels, and Mazarine, her ninth work of fiction, demonstrates that she knows England and its people well. Road trips always run the risk of turning into “holiday snaps” accounts – “and then she went there” – but the author is far too good for that.

Grimshaw’s earlier novels The Night Book and Soon were triumphs and would have been sitters for film or television adaptation in any other civilised country. For me, the central relationship in Mazarine intrigues but doesn’t fully convince, and Grimshaw has so many plot plates spinning – Maya, an encrypted USB drive, Frances’s bonkers family, the dodgy ex, Mazarine, a novel in progress, the threat of Islamic terrorism – that it’s no surprise a few wobble and the odd end is left untied or seems a little neat. But what a great film it would make, provided it could capture the book’s enjoyable swirl of interior and exterior and its many mysteries, not least Frances herself.

MAZARINE, by Charlotte Grimshaw (Vintage/Penguin Random House, $38)

This article was first published in the April 14, 2018 issue of the New Zealand Listener.

Latest

Why you should avoid 'eating for two' during pregnancy
98747 2018-11-18 00:00:00Z Health

Why you should avoid 'eating for two' during pregn…

by Ruth Nichol

Doubling down on food during pregnancy is out, unless it’s diet quality we’re talking about.

Read more
The long, slow goodbye to Angela Merkel
99173 2018-11-17 00:00:00Z World

The long, slow goodbye to Angela Merkel

by Cathrin Schaer

German Chancellor Angela Merkel plans to leave the job in 2021, but that’s not soon enough for some.

Read more
Silent witness: The forgotten NZ movie star
97576 2018-11-17 00:00:00Z Movies

Silent witness: The forgotten NZ movie star

by Paul Little

One of the earliest and possibly least known NZ movie stars is Eve Balfour, a silent-movie actress, born in Christchurch in 1890.

Read more
How the Christchurch earthquakes inspired British writer AN Wilson’s new novel
99087 2018-11-17 00:00:00Z Books

How the Christchurch earthquakes inspired British …

by Sally Blundell

AN Wilson has put aside biographies for a novel inspired by quake-devastated Christchurch – where he expects the book will get a tough reception.

Read more
Victory over the All Blacks this weekend would add to Ireland's epic history
99193 2018-11-17 00:00:00Z Sport

Victory over the All Blacks this weekend would add…

by Paul Thomas

Kiwi Joe Schmidt has a chance of adding to Irish rugby’s storied history in the upcoming game against the All Blacks.

Read more
A big science investment - but where’s the transparency?
99199 2018-11-17 00:00:00Z Tech

A big science investment - but where’s the transpa…

by Peter Griffin

An extra $420m is being pumped into the National Science Challenges - but the reasoning behind the increased investment won't be released.

Read more
NZ music legend Gray Bartlett has a new album – and a wild past
99182 2018-11-16 13:32:58Z Music

NZ music legend Gray Bartlett has a new album – an…

by Donna Chisholm

We revisit this profile on award-winning guitarist Gray Bartlett, who's just released a new album, Platinum!

Read more
Vint Cerf: The father of the Internet reflects on what his creation has become
99178 2018-11-16 13:13:08Z Tech

Vint Cerf: The father of the Internet reflects on …

by Peter Griffin

"We were just a bunch of engineers trying to make it work. It didn't even occur to us that anybody would want to wreck it," says Vint Cerf.

Read more