What our writers and reviewers thought about the Ockham Book Awards finalists

by The Listener / 06 March, 2019
The shortlist for the country's premier literary and non-fiction awards has been announced for 2019. Ockham book award-winners will be announced at the Auckland Writers Festival on May 14, alongside prizes including the four MitoQ Best First Book Awards and a Māori Language Award.

Here's the shortlist for the Ockham New Zealand Book Awards 2019 with links to our coverage:

The Acorn Foundation Fiction Prize:

The New Ships by Kate Duignan (Victoria University Press)

The Cage by Lloyd Jones (Penguin Random House)

This Mortal Boy by Fiona Kidman (Penguin Random House)

All This by Chance by Vincent O’Sullivan (Victoria University Press)

The Royal Society Te Apārangi Award for General Non-Fiction:

Hudson & Halls: The Food of Love by Joanne Drayton (Otago University Press)

Memory Pieces by Maurice Gee (Victoria University Press)

We Can Make a Life by Chessie Henry (Victoria University Press)

With Them Through Hell: New Zealand Medical Services in the First World War by Anna Rogers (Massey University Press)

The Mary and Peter Biggs Award for Poetry:

Are Friends Electric? by Helen Heath (Victoria University Press)

There's No Place Like the Internet in Springtime by Erik Kennedy (Victoria University Press)

The Facts by Therese Lloyd (Victoria University Press)

Poūkahangatus by Tayi Tibble (Victoria University Press)

The judging panel

The Acorn Foundation Fiction Prize: Sally Blundell, Rachael King and James George.

The Royal Society Te Apārangi Award for General Non-Fiction: Angela Wanhalla, Rebecca Priestley and Karl Chitham.

The Illustrated Non-Fiction Award: Douglas Lloyd Jenkins, Lucy Hammonds and Bruce Caddy.

The Poetry Award: Bryan Walpert, Airini Beautrais and Karlo Mila.

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