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On Radio: May 7, 2016

Including The Fall and Rise of Harpsichord 6, and composer, teacher and ethnomusicologist Jack Body.

Jack Body, Music Alive, Tuesday. Photo/Hagen Hopkins
Jack Body, Music Alive, Tuesday. Photo/Hagen Hopkins

SUNDAY MAY 8


The Sunday Feature (RNZ Concert, 2.00pm). The Fall and Rise of Harpsichord 6 is the colourful story of an instrument bought by the New Zealand Broadcasting Service in 1956 for use by the National Orchestra. It arrived in Wellington aboard the RMS Rangitoto, and James Gardner investigates its quirky maker, Thomas Goff of London, and also what went wrong when the harpsichord eventually got here. Hopefully, he’ll also reveal how the harpsichord acquired the nickname “The Beast”.

TUESDAY MAY 10


Music Alive (RNZ Concert, 7.00pm). Composer, teacher and ethnomusicologist Jack Body is celebrated in a concert recorded two weeks after his death on May 10, 2015. The concert features the New Zealand String Quartet, Baroque Voices, Anna Pierard and Gamelan Padhang Moncar, the Javanese music group managed by Body for many years. Gillian Whitehead’s ­tribute E Haki will be heard, and there are eulogies from Peter Walls, Michael Norris and Body’s niece, Vicki Holmes.

THURSDAY MAY 12


Music Alive (RNZ Concert, 7.00pm). British ­conductor Rumon Gamba’s visit to New Zealand in 2015 included presiding over the final of the Michael Hill Violin Compe­tition and this concert with the Auckland ­Philharmonia featuring Elgar’s masterwork, Enigma Variations. The evening began with Lilburn’s Aotearoa Overture and includes ­Bartok’s Second Violin Concerto, performed by Austrian violinist Benjamin Schmid. The performance of the Elgar classic “confirmed the English conductor’s considerable reputation”, said New Zealand Herald reviewer William Dart.

FRIDAY MAY 13


Music Alive (RNZ Concert, 7.00pm). Brahms ­specialist Stephen Hough is the highlight of tonight’s concert that comes live from the Michael Fowler Centre. The British ­pianist performs Piano Concerto No 2 under the baton of ­Spanish maestro Gustavo Gimeno. The NZSO also performs Gareth Farr’s From the Depths Sound the Great Sea Gongs and Shostakovich’s Symphony No 1.

Talkback


Your chance to comment on TV and radio

ENLIGHTENED


The first episode of Coast New Zealand was excellent viewing, but in the course of it a former lighthouse keeper who had served at Puysegur Point remarked that Alexander Parks was stationed there for 21 years.

In fact, as Helen Beaglehole writes in her book Always the Sound of the Sea: The Daily Lives of New Zealand’s Lighthouse Keepers, he served there from 1894-96. He protested against his transfer there and died in 1896 aged 51.

Colin Brown
(Christchurch)

CORO CALUMNY


We note that TV1 has dropped the repeats of Coronation Street during the week. It is only a matter of time before it drops the show altogether, I guess, as the implications have been leaking out for a long time that the child programmers in TV land think Coro Street is only a silly UK soap.

Much better for us are the cop chases, customs, courts and canine programmes they make for next to nothing. These, in our home, bore us silly.

Chris Allen
(Grey Lynn, Auckland)

TVNZ responds: The daytime repeat of Coronation Street hasn’t proved as popular as we’d hoped so we’ll be playing some new shows in that time slot. It is available for catch up OnDemand.

BLACKLOST


I am struggling with the rationale behind TV3’s decision to axe The Blacklist mid-season without any apparent explanation. (Okay, it was getting a bit silly, but is still good entertainment and James Spader is so watchable.)

I think loyal watchers deserve a bit better. The fact that prime time is filled with brainless fluff just makes me want to weep.

Kate Luff
(Waipawa)

TV3 responds: The Blacklist is taking a break from TV3 and 3NOW. There are seven episodes remaining and the series will return in just over a month.

SPOILER ALERT II


I agree with Joan Power (Talkback, April 16) that frequent interruptions for commercials and programme promotions spoil good films on TV.

The law against advertising on religious festival days is surely being flouted, as a TV channel promoting future programmes is still advertising, especially when programme titles increasingly include sponsors’ names.

It puzzles me that broadcasters and advertisers do not realise they are turning more and more people off.

Perhaps the frequency of ad breaks should be ­regulated, as it is in Scandi­navian countries.

Eli Kerin
(Dunedin)

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