Book Club is a frank and endearing look at late-life sexuality

by James Robins / 18 August, 2018
RelatedArticlesModule - Book Club movie

When four grande dames of Hollywood take on Fifty Shades of Grey in their literary club, gallivanting ensues.

”I’m not sure this qualifies as literature,” sneers Candice Bergen, holding a copy of Fifty Shades of Grey, the first in a trilogy of titillations that shocked the world – mainly for how badly they were written. The rest of her book club – Diane Keaton, Jane Fonda, Mary Steenburgen – look equally appalled. They started out in the 1970s reading Erica Jong, and this is how far they’ve fallen?

I mean really, we’ve just put the Fifty Shades film adaptations behind us and now Book Club is subjecting a quartet of Hollywood’s grande dames to barely literate soft-bondage. What’s the safe word, please?

However, this ensemble romcom has a surprise ready to leap out from under the faux-leather. It’s actually quite good – an endearing and frank look at late-life female sexuality, so often ignored or made to seem taboo.

Fifty Shades proves to be a catalyst for an awakening. They all know the books are dreck. What’s more important are the feelings and possibilities that are stirred. Fonda needs no help as a rapacious hotelier allergic to commitment. Bergen, meanwhile, plays a federal judge tempted by the thrills of online dating (cue cameos by Richard Dreyfuss and Wallace Shawn). Steenburgen’s character is the only one still married, though her husband (Craig T Nelson) has become impotent.

As for Keaton, she’s still playing herself, all anxious chuckles and elegantly adapted menswear. Until the ever-charming Andy Garcia flashes a mischievous grin and sweeps her away. And to be honest, who wouldn’t want to be swept away by Andy Garcia? Much of Book Club ought to rankle, especially the aping of Nancy Meyers-style confections: enormous mansions, gleaming kitchens, cafe jazz on the soundtrack, everything ultra-saturated in eye-watering warmth.

The script leans heavily on innuendo, and the only real filthiness is how unashamedly rich everyone is.

Yet there’s real bite and wit in the dialogue (Bergen gets the best lines), and the bulk of the comedy exploits the expectations of older women: that, after the rigours of family and career, they really ought to be bundled into sterile rest homes rather than be allowed to gallivant with grey-haired Galahads. Judging by this, the gallivanting looks joyous. Have at it, I say.

Video: Transmission Films

IN CINEMAS NOW

★★★1/2

This article was first published in the August 25, 2018 issue of the New Zealand Listener.

Latest

Why you should avoid 'eating for two' during pregnancy
98747 2018-11-18 00:00:00Z Health

Why you should avoid 'eating for two' during pregn…

by Ruth Nichol

Doubling down on food during pregnancy is out, unless it’s diet quality we’re talking about.

Read more
The long, slow goodbye to Angela Merkel
99173 2018-11-17 00:00:00Z World

The long, slow goodbye to Angela Merkel

by Cathrin Schaer

German Chancellor Angela Merkel plans to leave the job in 2021, but that’s not soon enough for some.

Read more
Silent witness: The forgotten NZ movie star
97576 2018-11-17 00:00:00Z Movies

Silent witness: The forgotten NZ movie star

by Paul Little

One of the earliest and possibly least known NZ movie stars is Eve Balfour, a silent-movie actress, born in Christchurch in 1890.

Read more
How the Christchurch earthquakes inspired British writer AN Wilson’s new novel
99087 2018-11-17 00:00:00Z Books

How the Christchurch earthquakes inspired British …

by Sally Blundell

AN Wilson has put aside biographies for a novel inspired by quake-devastated Christchurch – where he expects the book will get a tough reception.

Read more
Victory over the All Blacks this weekend would add to Ireland's epic history
99193 2018-11-17 00:00:00Z Sport

Victory over the All Blacks this weekend would add…

by Paul Thomas

Kiwi Joe Schmidt has a chance of adding to Irish rugby’s storied history in the upcoming game against the All Blacks.

Read more
A big science investment - but where’s the transparency?
99199 2018-11-17 00:00:00Z Tech

A big science investment - but where’s the transpa…

by Peter Griffin

An extra $420m is being pumped into the National Science Challenges - but the reasoning behind the increased investment won't be released.

Read more
NZ music legend Gray Bartlett has a new album – and a wild past
99182 2018-11-16 13:32:58Z Music

NZ music legend Gray Bartlett has a new album – an…

by Donna Chisholm

We revisit this profile on award-winning guitarist Gray Bartlett, who's just released a new album, Platinum!

Read more
Vint Cerf: The father of the Internet reflects on what his creation has become
99178 2018-11-16 13:13:08Z Tech

Vint Cerf: The father of the Internet reflects on …

by Peter Griffin

"We were just a bunch of engineers trying to make it work. It didn't even occur to us that anybody would want to wreck it," says Vint Cerf.

Read more