Princess Chelsea's art-pop confection finds strength in its innocent sound

by Gary Steel / 28 September, 2018
RelatedArticlesModule - Related

Chelsea Nikkel, aka Princess Chelsea.

Princess Chelsea's new album is the complete package.

The net effect of Princess Chelsea’s intimate, naive presentation should be as cloying as the cute pop pastiche of the group that built her record label into a thing, The Brunettes. But somehow, she manages to sidestep that irritant factor.

In ways reminiscent of David Lynch’s original Twin Peaks song-bird Julee Cruise, Princess Chelsea — every bit as much a character creation — conveys a similar sense of tarnished innocence, but without the doomed gravitas of Cruise. Instead, hers is a sugar sweetness with a lacing of strychnine.

Chelsea Nikkel’s fourth album, The Loneliest Girl, shares the slightly sly, knowing aesthetic of label-mate Jonathan Bree, whose excellent recent album, Sleepwalking, also displays an impulse to understand and address grown-up realities. Nikkel’s is a record about the loneliness of relationships, coming to terms with infidelity, carnal imperatives versus love loyalty, the scariness of ageing (or, at least, being a little less young and perfect), and it’s full of simple but well-articulated observations and rationalisations.

On previous albums Princess Chelsea was living the dream, or dreaming her reality, but here it feels as if real life has pricked her bubble. A song like “Good Enough” plays out like a jaundiced musical fairy tale with a sting in its tail, as it describes a “funny girl who stayed inside all day and night” and finally met her match in a “funny boy” who liked the same things as her, but how eventually, “she knew he would break her heart”.

On the best song, “The Pretty Ones”, her baby-girl voice takes on the sound of real spite as she describes infidelity and seemingly unstoppable carnal lust as “an age-old situation… in pursuit of the perfect gene… this is how the world spins around”, and it feels like the real Chelsea Nikkel is peeking through the curtains of her own creation. Then, on “I Love My Boyfriend”, she’s dealing with her own sexual impulses towards a friend: “Every time he looks at me I get electric shocks in my brain and heart, but he is not the one I love… I know that it is only chemistry.”

Throughout The Loneliest Girl, Princess Chelsea transforms what might have been mere pastiche into an art-pop confection that dares to talk about what it’s like to be a young woman negotiating the fraught transition from carefree dreamer to responsible adult. These songs seem light and sometimes slight, but that’s actually their strength. Nikkel reduces words and music to a winning simplicity, but whether she’s dishing out clouds of spectral synth, writing chord changes out of John Barry’s 007 book or getting a robotic Giorgio Moroder groove on, it’s a complete package and it works.

Princess Chelsea performs at the Hollywood, Avondale, on October 26, as part of her nationwide The Loneliest Girl tour.

THE LONELIEST GIRL (Lil’ Chief)

4/5

Latest

Ditch the intergenerational housing blame game, and focus on some home truths
99836 2018-12-10 00:00:00Z Social issues

Ditch the intergenerational housing blame game, an…

by Virginia Larson

What we don’t need is sloppy statistics kindling an intergenerational stoush that does no one any good.

Read more
Sally Lewis: The modern-day monk teaching meditation to prisoners
100143 2018-12-10 00:00:00Z Profiles

Sally Lewis: The modern-day monk teaching meditati…

by Clare de Lore

Could an ancient form of meditation change the lives of prisoners for better? Sally Lewis says it can.

Read more
What's inside North & South's January 2019 issue?
99815 2018-12-10 00:00:00Z Life in NZ

What's inside North & South's January 2019 issue?

by North & South

We look at the riskiest places in NZ to live, what it'll take to fix the Family Court and review 2018's weirdest and wackiest things.

Read more
The Brexit deal is the perfect Prisoner's Dilemma
100059 2018-12-09 00:00:00Z World

The Brexit deal is the perfect Prisoner's Dilemma

by Andrew Anthony

In the Prisoner's Dilemma, going after what you want – freedom – might get you the very worst outcome. It's Brexit, in other words.

Read more
How Britain's MI6 gave the world modern spycraft
100061 2018-12-09 00:00:00Z Television

How Britain's MI6 gave the world modern spycraft

by Fiona Rae

Espionage nerd David Jason takes us inside the world of secret agents, including the inaugural MI6 boss’ car.

Read more
Louis Theroux grapples with his own failure in new Jimmy Savile doco
100072 2018-12-09 00:00:00Z Television

Louis Theroux grapples with his own failure in new…

by Diana Wichtel

A chastened Louis Theroux tries to shed light on a celebrity sex fiend's brazen cunning in a new documentary.

Read more
The extraordinary story of how New Zealand entered the space race
100028 2018-12-09 00:00:00Z Business

The extraordinary story of how New Zealand entered…

by Sally Blundell

Half a century after the first manned spacecraft orbited the moon, the space race is back on and New Zealand is in the game. But are we ready?

Read more
Quiet, please! The commodification of silence
97964 2018-12-09 00:00:00Z Travel

Quiet, please! The commodification of silence

by Margo White

The commodification of quiet – how silence became a top trend in wellness tourism.

Read more