On Radio, February 13-19: including Li-Wei Qin

by Fiona Rae / 04 February, 2016
The best of the week.
Li-Wei Qin, Music Alive, Thursday.
Li-Wei Qin, Music Alive, Thursday.

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 14


These Hopeful Machines (RNZ Concert, 5.00pm). A six-part series in which British keyboard player James Gardner looks at the history of electronic music and talks to some of its pioneers, such as Peter Zinovieff, who created the VCS3 synthesiser used by Pink Floyd and Kraftwerk, and British composer and sound technician Brian Hodgson, the original sound-effects creator for Doctor Who, who famously invented the sound of the Tardis and the voices of the Daleks.

MONDAY FEBRUARY 15


Music Alive (RNZ Concert, 8.00pm). A Multi-keyboard Extravaganza featuring Michael Tsalka and James Tibbles and six keyboards. The pianists explore early keyboard music that runs from Louis XIV’s court through to 18th-century Berlin, Rome and Salzburg and 19th-century Vienna.

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 17


Appointment (RNZ Concert, 7.00pm). John Drummond’s Interrupted Cadences: What If? series continues with a look at what might have happened if Clara Wieck had turned down Robert Schumann’s proposal in 1837. After all, when a guy writes such sweet nothings as “the first year of our marriage you shall forget the artist: you shall live only for yourself and your house and your husband”, what’s a brilliant concert pianist to do?

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 18


Music Alive (RNZ Concert, 8.00pm). The Auckland Philharmonia’s new season begins with Mahler’s huge Symphony No 5 and a rarely heard masterwork, William Walton’s Cello Concerto, which will be performed by Australian virtuoso Li-Wei Qin. Walton wrote the concerto in 1956 and it is considered one of the finest string concertos of the 20th century. The evening’s entertainment, entitled A Grand Opening, will be broadcast live from the Auckland Town Hall. Mahler enthusiasts may also enjoy Tuesday’s Music Alive (8.00pm) in which Symphony No 2 is performed by the Christchurch Symphony, the Melbourne Youth Orchestra, the Christ­church City Choir and soprano Amanda Atlas and mezzo Bianca Andrew.

Talkback


Your chance to comment on TV and radio

NAME THAT PROGRAMME


I’d love to know the name of the TV1 documentary shown on January 17. I came in after it had started, but it was a splendid long interview with an East Coast Maori who was carefully instilling his tribe’s stories and histories into his grandchildren.

This would normally come and go, but I have a New Zealand friend in Perth who is envious of the amount of Maori television being broadcast here and she’s asked me to try to find a source of these documentaries. She wants to persuade her TV friends to include this kind of content in their programmes.

Ruth Bedford
(Kaikohe)

PIP, PIP


RNZ’s Checkpoint is now available on TV and radio, but the 6.00pm time signal on TV on February 1 was five seconds or so later than the radio one. Which signal is right?

Paul Whitehead
(Katikati)

RNZ’s head of technology Matthew Finn responds: The Freeview system has about five seconds’ delay in it because, like all digital transmission systems, the video and audio have to be digitised (turned into ones and zeros), then turned back into video and sound by the receiving device (usually a television). The delay can be even greater if you’re watching on the internet. Someone with a poor internet connection, for example, may end up watching the programme with more than a minute’s delay.

ANNOYING LOGOS


When watching cricket and tennis on Prime and TV3, it is annoying to have details such as names and scores obscured by the station logos in the bottom-left corner of the screen. Surely someone could look at a screen occasionally to see what viewers are actually seeing.

A Oaktree
(Takapuna, Auckland)

ANOTHER STORY, ENTIRELY


Does RNZ have any idea how many – if any – children listen to Storytime on Saturday and Sunday mornings? The notion in this day and age of the little darlings sitting around the wireless listening to stories while their parents do whatever parents do in the bedroom is comically old-fashioned.

Surely RNZ can find something worthwhile for the weekend pre-breakfast slot. How about Garrison Keillor to set us up for the week?

David Lawson
(Kohimarama, Auckland)

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