On Radio, February 20-26: including Wagner

by Fiona Rae / 11 February, 2016
The best of the week.
Wagner, Wednesday, 7.00pm. Photo/Getty Images
Wagner, Wednesday, 7.00pm. Photo/Getty Images

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 21


The Sunday Feature (RNZ National, 4.06pm). The BBC Reith Lectures were this year delivered by Stephen ­Hawking on the subject of black holes; in the second lecture, he advances the idea that not all matter and information is destroyed within them.

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 24


Appointment (RNZ Concert, 7.00pm). Tonight’s Interrupted Cadences: What If …? ponders a question to make a Wagner fan’s blood run cold: what if the great composer had been arrested for treason in 1849? A warrant had been issued for his arrest for taking part in the Dresden Revolution and he fled to Switzerland, taking the outline of the Ring Cycle with him.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 25


Music Alive (RNZ Concert, 8.00pm). The Auckland Philharmonia’s Poetry and Power is live from the Auckland Town Hall and features Croatian pianist Dejan Lazić, who performs Brahms’ turbulent and emotional Piano Concerto No 1. The poetry continues with Debussy and Ravel’s tributes to Spain, Images: Iberia and Rapsodie Espagnole.

Talkback


Your chance to comment on TV and radio

SEEING RED

I have wondered for a while why some of the times in the Listener’s TV listings are in red. Many are 6.00pm, but there are also times of 6.40, 6.50, 6.35, 7.00 and so on. The only connection I can see is that all these times are 6.00pm or after. I have also wondered why each day has a different colour at the top of the page.

Ross Lambourn
(Onehunga, Auckland)

Fiona Rae responds: You are quite right, Ross. The colours indicate the start of evening programmes, at 6.00pm or in the first slot after 6.00pm. The different colours make it easier to distinguish the days of the week.

THE POWER OF ONE

Over the holiday period, both TV1 and TV3 used one newsreader to present the 6.00pm news. The sky hasn’t fallen. The Earth hasn’t stopped turning. It’s the news being shown in the normal way. It invites the question: why do we need two newsreaders for the rest of the year?

Peter Spiller
(St Albans, Christchurch)

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