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The photo that moved the world: The World Press Photo of the Year 2019 winner

“I think that this image touched many people’s hearts as it did mine because it humanized a larger story. “ – John Moore, World Press Photo of the Year winner.

The World Press Photo of the Year has been selected with the exhibition set to open June 29 in Auckland.

The jury of the 2019 Photo Contest has selected John Moore (United States)’s image Crying Girl on the Border as the World Press Photo of the Year.

The winning image shows Honduran toddler Yanela Sanchez crying as she and her mother, Sandra Sanchez, are taken into custody by US border officials in McAllen, Texas, USA, on 12 June 2018. After this picture was published worldwide, US Customs and Border Protection confirmed that Yanela and her mother had not been among the thousands who had been separated by US officials as per a policy designed to deter illegal immigration.

Nevertheless, public outcry over the controversial practice resulted in President Donald Trump reversing the policy on 20 June.

WORLD PRESS PHOTO OF THE YEAR - WINNER

Crying Girl on the Border © John Moore, Getty Images

Honduran toddler Yanela Sanchez cries as she and her mother, Sandra Sanchez, are taken into custody by US border officials in McAllen, Texas, USA, on 12 June 2018.

Immigrant families had rafted across the Rio Grande from Mexico and were then detained by US authorities. Sandra Sanchez said that she and her daughter had been traveling for a month through Central America and Mexico before reaching the US to seek asylum. The Trump Administration had announced a ‘zero tolerance’ policy at the border under which immigrants caught entering the US could be criminally prosecuted. As a result, many apprehended parents were separated from their children, often sent to different detention facilities. After this picture was published worldwide, US Customs and Border Protection confirmed that Yanela and her mother had not been among the thousands who had been separated by US officials. Nevertheless, public outcry over the controversial practice resulted in President Donald Trump reversing the policy on 20 June.


WORLD PRESS PHOTO OF THE YEAR NOMINEE

Almajiri Boy © Marco Gualazzini, Contrasto

An orphaned boy walks past a wall with drawings depicting rocket-propelled grenade launchers, in Bol, Chad.

A humanitarian crisis is underway in the Chad Basin, caused by a complex combination of political conflict and environmental factors. Lake Chad—once one of Africa’s largest lakes and a lifeline to 40 million people—is experiencing massive desertification. As a result of unplanned irrigation, extended drought, deforestation and resource mismanagement, the size of the lake has decreased by 90 percent over the past 60 years. Traditional livelihoods such as fishing have withered, and water shortages are causing conflict between farmers and cattle herders. Jihadist group Boko Haram, which is active in the area, both benefits from the hardship and widespread hunger and contributes to it. The group uses local villages as a recruiting ground, and the protracted conflict has uprooted 2.5 million people, exacerbating food insecurity.   

The Lake Chad Crisis was funded by InsideOver.

 


WORLD PRESS PHOTO OF THE YEAR NOMINEE

Victims of an Alleged Gas Attack Receive Treatment in Eastern Ghouta © Mohammed Badra, European Pressphoto Agency

A man and a child receive treatment after the suspected gas attack on al-Shifunieh, Eastern Ghouta, Syria, 25 February 2018.


By February 2018, the people of Eastern Ghouta, a suburban district outside Damascus and one of the last rebel enclaves in the ongoing Syrian conflict, had been under siege by government forces for five years. During the final offensive, Eastern Ghouta came under rocket fire and air bombardment, including at least one alleged gas attack—on the village of al-Shifunieh, on 25 February. Figures are difficult to verify, but Médecins Sans Frontiѐres (MSF) reported 4,829 wounded and 1,005 killed between 18 February and 3 March, according to data from medical facilities they supported alone. MSF also reported 13 hospitals and clinics damaged or destroyed in just three days. Reports on the end of the siege in Eastern Ghouta are conflicting, though the Syrian army appear to have recaptured most of the south of the country by July. UNICEF reported the siege of Eastern Ghouta to have ended by late March, with limited humanitarian access becoming available.


WORLD PRESS PHOTO OF THE YEAR NOMINEE

Being Pregnant After FARC Child-Bearing Ban © Catalina Martin-Chico, Panos

Yorladis is pregnant for the sixth time, after five other pregnancies were terminated during her FARC years. She says she managed to hide the fifth pregnancy from her commander until the sixth month by wearing loose clothes.

Since the signing of a peace agreement between the Colombian government and the FARC rebel movement in 2016, there has been a baby boom among former female guerrillas, many living in the demobilization camps set up to help FARC members in the transition back to everyday life. Pregnancy was thought incompatible with guerrilla life. Women were obliged to put war before children, leaving babies with relatives or, some say, undergoing forced abortions—a charge FARC denies.


WORLD PRESS PHOTO OF THE YEAR NOMINEE

The Disappearance of Jamal Kashoggi © Chris McGrath, Getty Images

An unidentified man tries to hold back the press as Saudi investigators arrive at the Saudi Arabian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, amid a growing international backlash to the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.


Story:
A critic of the Saudi regime, Khashoggi had been missing since entering the consulate on 2 October to obtain documents. After weeks of rumor and false information, Riyadh announced that Khashoggi had been killed accidentally during an altercation. Turkish authorities and the CIA claimed he had been murdered by Saudi intelligence operatives, working under high Saudi authority.


WORLD PRESS PHOTO OF THE YEAR NOMINEE

Akashinga - the Brave Ones © Brent Stirton, Getty Images

Petronella Chigumbura  (30), a member of an all-female anti-poaching unit called Akashinga, participates in stealth and concealment training in the Phundundu Wildlife Park, Zimbabwe.

Akashinga (‘The Brave Ones’) is a ranger force established as an alternative conservation model. It aims to work with, rather than against local populations, for the long-term benefits of their communities and the environment. Akashinga comprises women from disadvantaged backgrounds, empowering them, offering jobs, and helping local people to benefit directly from the preservation of wildlife. Other strategies—such as using fees from trophy hunting to fund conservation—have been criticized for imposing solutions from the outside and excluding the needs of local people.


WORLD PRESS PHOTO STORY OF THE YEAR WINNER

The Migrant Caravan © Pieter Ten Hoopen, Agence Vu/Civilian Act

During October and November 2018, thousands of Central American migrants joined a caravan heading to the United States border. The caravan, assembled through a grassroots social media campaign, left San Pedro Sula, Honduras, on 12 October 2018, and as word spread drew people from Nicaragua, El Salvador and Guatemala. They were a mix of those facing political repression and violence, and those fleeing harsh economic conditions in the hope of a better life. Traveling in a caravan offered a degree of safety on a route where migrants have previously disappeared or been kidnapped, and was an alternative to paying high rates to people smugglers.


Migrant caravans travel to the US border at different times each year, but this was the largest in recent memory with as many as 7,000 travelers, including at least 2,300 children, according to UN agencies. Conditions along the way were grueling, with people walking around 30 km a day, often in temperatures above 30℃. The caravan usually set off at around 4am each day to avoid the heat. Like others, this caravan drew condemnation from US president Donald Trump, who made it a focal point of rallies and used it to reiterate his call for tough immigration policies and the building of a border wall.


Families bathe, wash clothes and relax beside the Rio Novillero, when the caravan takes a rest day near Tapanatepec.


A father and son sleep after a long day’s walking, Juchitán, 30 October 2018.


A girl pick flowers during the day’s walk from Tapanatepec to Niltepec, a distance of 50 km.

 

See the rest of the winning photos at https://www.worldpressphoto.org/.


THE WORLD PRESS PHOTO STORY OF THE YEAR

To put the spotlight on the stories that matter, this year the World Press Photo Foundation introduced the ‘World Press Photo Story of the Year’ award. The jury chose The Migrant Caravan by Pieter Ten Hoopen (Netherlands/Sweden), as World Press Photo Story of the Year.

The winning series documents the largest migrant caravan in recent memory, with as many as 7,000 travelers, including at least 2,300 children, according to UN agencies.

The caravan, assembled through a grassroots social media campaign, left San Pedro Sula, Honduras, on 12 October, and as word spread drew people from Nicaragua, El Salvador and Guatemala. Learn more about the series here.

The World Press Photo Foundation announced the results of the 62nd annual World Press Photo Contest and the 9th annual World Press Photo Digital Storytelling Contest, at its annual Awards Show in Amsterdam, on 11 April.

The exhibition comes to Auckland, New Zealand 29 June-28 July 2019.