PM in New York: Ardern's first speech focuses on lifting children from poverty

by Chris Bramwell / 24 September, 2018
RelatedArticlesModule - PM New York trip

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, right, with UNICEF executive director Henrietta Fore in New York. Photo / Chris Bramwell

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has used her first speech in the US to recommit the government to making New Zealand the best place in the world to be a child.

Ms Ardern arrived in Manhattan yesterday for the United Nations General Assembly for a week of meetings, high-level speeches and media appearances.

More than 140 world leaders are gathering for the annual meeting amid tight security.

Ms Ardern gave her first speech of the week in the early hours of this morning New Zealand time, opening the Social Good Summit in Manhattan.

Her speech focused mainly on her government's plans to lift children in New Zealand out of poverty and to assist low and middle-income families.

She said a year on from New Zealand's election which ultimately brought her into office, she was recommitting to working with the international community to make things better for children.

"To make sure that no matter where you are born in the world, your local school is the best school, there is food and a health system that you can rely on and perhaps most importantly that you are loved and that you are heard."

Ms Ardern told the summit to rapturous applause that despite New Zealand only being a small country of 4.5 million people it was the first country to give women the right to vote 125 years ago.

"We've had three female prime ministers guys - it's really no big deal!"

New York is going into lockdown as the world leaders start to arrive.

Security is tight as world leaders arrive in New York. Photo / Chris Bramwell

All around New York there are signs of the massive security operation about to swing into action.

The New York City Police Department has put thousands of uniformed and plain-clothes officers throughout the area around the United Nations.

In addition, it is bringing in 50 trucks full of sand, and hundreds of other vehicles to block attacks, 230 pieces of concrete and 96 jersey barriers.

Photo / Chris Bramwell

Seven surface-mounted delta vehicle barriers have been placed at potentially sensitive locations.

Security will step up a notch while US President Donald Trump is in the city.

This article was originally published by RNZ.

Latest

How Whangārei became New Zealand's home of jugger
99256 2018-12-12 00:00:00Z Life in NZ

How Whangārei became New Zealand's home of jugger

by Michael Botur

On every second Sabbath, grown men and women armed with foam chase a dog skull around Whangārei’s Kensington Park.

Read more
New Zealand's silent Pasifika mental health crisis
100357 2018-12-11 17:18:21Z Health

New Zealand's silent Pasifika mental health crisis…

by Indira Stewart

What do you do if your culture treats mental illness like a curse? Bury it deep.

Read more
The smart speaker with a screen: How does the Amazon Echo Show stack up?
100317 2018-12-11 15:10:01Z Tech

The smart speaker with a screen: How does the Amaz…

by Peter Griffin

A review of the Amazon Echo Show smart speaker.

Read more
Domestic violence: 'There's a huge amount of work that needs to be done' – PM
100265 2018-12-11 10:30:17Z Social issues

Domestic violence: 'There's a huge amount of work …

by RNZ

Grace Millane's death is a reminder of the work that needs to be done to reduce violence directed at women in this country, says the PM.

Read more
Finally, a trio of chunky referendum issues to spice up the next election
99872 2018-12-11 00:00:00Z Politics

Finally, a trio of chunky referendum issues to spi…

by Bevan Rapson

The possibility of Kiwis voting on three contentious issues – euthanasia, cannabis and an MMP shakeup – is like crowdsourcing political decisions.

Read more
The bullying allegations show that Parliament needs transparency
100228 2018-12-11 00:00:00Z Politics

The bullying allegations show that Parliament need…

by Bill Ralston

As a review stalks bullies in the corridors of power, Bill Ralston writes that abuse thrives in the darkness.

Read more
Mortal Engines is like Star Wars on Middle-earth but lacks memorable characters
100219 2018-12-11 00:00:00Z Movies

Mortal Engines is like Star Wars on Middle-earth b…

by Russell Baillie

In a world where cities are humungous all-terrain vehicles, Peter Jackson’s protégé gets bogged down.

Read more
How art therapy is helping stroke victims speak a new language
99448 2018-12-11 00:00:00Z Health

How art therapy is helping stroke victims speak a …

by Donna Chisholm

re-stART, an Auckland art therapy programme, is thought to be the first in the world targeting stroke survivors.

Read more