Black Ferns go on the NZR payroll

by RNZ / 12 March, 2018
Black Fern Portia Woodman enroute to scoring her team's second try during the Women's Rugby World Cup 2017 Semi Final match against the United States. Photo/Getty

Black Fern Portia Woodman enroute to scoring her team's second try during the Women's Rugby World Cup 2017 Semi Final match against the United States. Photo/Getty

Payday for the Black Ferns 

The Black Ferns are officially on New Zealand Rugby's payroll.

New Zealand Rugby has announced it will contract its top 30 women's players with the contracts ranging from $12,500 to $20,000 a year.

Players will also get a $2000 a week assembly fee with leading players able to earn a maximum of $45,000 a year.

Players will be expected to train 10 to 14 hours a week and the contracted players will assemble 50 days a year.

After winning their fifth world cup last year, pressure mounted for the Black Ferns to be contracted on a similar basis to the All Blacks.

Fiao'o Faamausili, the New Zealand Black Ferns captain raises the world cup after their victory at the Women's Rugby World Cup 2017 Final against England at the Kingspan Stadium on August 26, 2017 in Belfast, United Kingdom. Photo/Getty.

Fiao'o Faamausili, the New Zealand Black Ferns captain raises the world cup after their victory at the Women's Rugby World Cup 2017 Final against England at the Kingspan Stadium on August 26, 2017 in Belfast, United Kingdom. Photo/Getty.

RelatedArticlesModule - Rugby related

Chief executive of New Zealand Rugby Steve Tew said the contracts signal a new era in the sport with the women representing the fastest growing area of the sport with one in seven rugby players now female.

"The Black Ferns and the Black Ferns Sevens have rapidly grown in profile, statue, and relevance on the international stage. This agreement supports them to be the best they can be when wearing the black jersey," he said.

Chief executive of the New Zealand Rugby Players Association Rob Nichol said "this is a significant milestone for the women's 15 game. It is a long-term sustainable model that offers genuine pathways and support for female players on and off the field, and that we can build on in the future.

"The MOU has a strong focus on personal and career development, ensures the provision of key life, trauma and medical insurances, access to quality savings programs while taking care of all the normal terms and conditions expected within a modern-day employment environment.

"The maternity policy gives the players the appropriate support to return to the game if they choose after having a baby. This gives players the flexibility to make important life decision while continuing their rugby pathway," he said.

New Zealand Rugby will also establish a working group to assess future competition options at international and domestic level.

This article was first published on RNZ.

Latest

How you can help crack the insect code at Te Papa
101529 2019-01-23 00:00:00Z Science

How you can help crack the insect code at Te Papa

by Sam Button

Te Papa is on a mission to decipher the secret life of insects.

Read more
Bill Ralston says goodbye to Auckland
101333 2019-01-23 00:00:00Z Life in NZ

Bill Ralston says goodbye to Auckland

by Bill Ralston

Our columnist finally turns his back on the congested, costly city of his birth.

Read more
Decision to force woman to pay likely abuser will have 'chilling effect'
101496 2019-01-22 11:12:54Z Crime

Decision to force woman to pay likely abuser will…

by RNZ

The lawyer of a woman ordered to pay $28,000 to her likely abuser has urged the justice minister to intervene.

Read more
7 traits that show how unsuited Trump is to the White House
101194 2019-01-22 00:00:00Z World

7 traits that show how unsuited Trump is to the Wh…

by Paul Thomas

Instead of striving to be disciplined, dedicated and presidential, Trump is flitting between seven characters that have no place in the White House.

Read more
Why vitamin D production is slower in old age
101151 2019-01-22 00:00:00Z Nutrition

Why vitamin D production is slower in old age

by Jennifer Bowden

Getting our quota of vitamin D becomes more important – but more difficult – as we age.

Read more
Why ethical eating often stops at the restaurant door
101520 2019-01-22 00:00:00Z Food

Why ethical eating often stops at the restaurant d…

by Rachel A. Ankeny and Heather Bray

Can a chef promote foraging, seasonality and plant-based eating, yet also serve meat and other animal-derived protein products on the same menu?

Read more
Why the Dunedin Museum of Natural Mystery is bound to attract the curious
101463 2019-01-22 00:00:00Z Life in NZ

Why the Dunedin Museum of Natural Mystery is bound…

by Ellen Rykers

Artist Bruce Mahalski's museum is the result of a lifetime of collecting.

Read more
Gillette ad isn't anti-men, it's anti-toxic masculinity – it should be welcomed
101480 2019-01-21 16:59:29Z Social issues

Gillette ad isn't anti-men, it's anti-toxic mascul…

by Nicola Bishop

The backlash against the Gillette ad shows how painfully little distance we as a society have covered since the #MeToo movement.

Read more